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31
Infoshop News / They Called Her ?the Che Gueva...
Last post by Alternative Media Project - December 15, 2018, 10:01:26 am
They Called Her ?the Che Guevara of Abortion Reformers?

A decade before Roe, Pat Maginnis? radical activism?and righteous rage?changed the abortion debate forever.


The post They Called Her ?the Che Guevara of Abortion Reformers? appeared first on Infoshop News.


Source: They Called Her ?the Che Guevara of Abortion Reformers?
32
Infoshop News / Alan MacSimóin (1957-2018): a ...
Last post by Alternative Media Project - December 15, 2018, 10:01:26 am
Alan MacSimóin (1957-2018): a pioneer of anarchism in Ireland

On December 5th we were pained to hear about the untimely death of Alan MacSimóin, veteran anarchist, trade unionist and tireless organiser in Ireland. Today we said farewell to him at Glasnevin cemetery in Dublin, where many other revolutionaries before him have been put to rest. Many friends and comrades from all parties and movements of the left joined his family to bid farewell to this exceptional man.


The post Alan MacSimóin (1957-2018): a pioneer of anarchism in Ireland appeared first on Infoshop News.


Source: Alan MacSimóin (1957-2018): a pioneer of anarchism in Ireland
33
Infoshop News / Why Hondurans See Migration as...
Last post by Alternative Media Project - December 15, 2018, 10:01:26 am
Why Hondurans See Migration as an Act of Civil Disobedience

In walking out of their country en masse, Hondurans are making a loud, bold statement about the extreme injustices they face at home.


The post Why Hondurans See Migration as an Act of Civil Disobedience appeared first on Infoshop News.


Source: Why Hondurans See Migration as an Act of Civil Disobedience
34
AlterNet / Research finds that orangutans...
Last post by AlterNet - December 15, 2018, 10:01:25 am
Research finds that orangutans can communicate about the past just like humans


Orangutan infants stay with their mothers as long as human children do.


The evolution of language converted a defenceless naked ape into a world-dominating force. It fundamentally transformed how humans transmit information and knowledge. A large and potent component of language is our ability to communicate about things that are not here, that happened in the past, or that will happen in the future. This feature of language is known as ?displaced reference?.

Displaced reference is universal across the world?s languages and pervades our daily lives. In fact, to speak about the present moment has become a rarity nowadays, though noticeable exceptions are when we comment about the weather, ask for the salt over the dinner table, or talk with very young children.

Displaced reference unshackles speakers from the present. The magnitude of information that becomes available to individuals (or species) capable of displaced reference is therefore immeasurably greater than individuals (or species) strictly living in ?the here and the now? ? which is the bulk of the animal kingdom.

So far, besides humans, only social insects are capable of displaced reference. It is remarkable how honey bees (and their tiny brains) can communicate, for instance, about the location of distant food sources to other bees in the hive. The discovery of this fact merited a Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine for Karl von Frisch in 1973. Displaced reference in social insects spawns many fascinating ? and unanswered ? questions about animal intelligence and what the minimal viable intelligence systems for a particular cognitive capacity are.

However, biologically, bees and other insects are far apart from humans and can tell us very little about how language evolution played out among our ancestors. Lacking examples in vertebrates, mammals, or non-human primates, including great apes ? our closest relatives ? scientists literally had no clues about how this capacity came about in humans. But this is the new jigsaw piece that wild orangutans are bringing to the puzzle of language evolution.

The missing link?

In the low mountain rainforests of Sumatra, Indonesia, our team simulated a natural encounter with a predator to study the vocal responses of wild orangutan females. The set up consisted of a human researcher, disguised as a forest big cat, parading on all fours across the forest floor in front of the orangutan females.

We observed that, despite showing all sorts of distress (including urinating and defecating), orangutan females refrained from responding vocally towards the ?predator?. Instead, they waited up to 20 minutes to communicate their alarm to their offspring, long after the predator had left the scene. Across several experiments there was an average delay of seven minutes before the females vocally expressed their alarm.

The data (and simple common sense if we imagine ourselves facing a wild Sumatran tiger!) suggest that to respond vocally in the presence of a predator would have been a huge risk to the orangutans? safety. If the females had responded immediately by calling out warnings, the predator could have detected them and perhaps attempted an attack, particularly on the infant orangutans.

Instead, the mothers waited for a significant amount of time before signalling vocal alarm about the danger that had now passed. The question that springs to mind, then, is: why did the females signal their alarm at all? If they hadn?t responded vocally at any point, they wouldn?t have faced any danger at all, right?

That is undoubtedly true; but had the mothers not expressed alarm, their infants would have remained oblivious to one of the most lethal dangers in the rainforest. Instead, the females waited long enough until it was safe to call out, but not so long that their infants could not connect their mothers? vocal distress with what had just happened, and understand that it was extremely dangerous. The female orangutans were teaching their young about the dangers in the forest by referring to something that had happened in the (recent) past.

In the 1970s, early attempts to release rescued orangutans and reintroduce them back into this same forest failed miserably. Nearly all the released animals fell prey to forest cats, essentially for lack of knowledge about survival in the rainforest.

Orangutan infants stay with their mothers as long as human children do. It has been shown that this exceptionally long period ensures that mothers pass on a variety of knowledge, skills and tools to their offspring. Our new findings indicate that teaching about predators is a vital aspect of this.

Widening this out to human language evolution, orangutans exemplify how our ancestors probably communicated beyond the here-and-now about the past, and possibly the future, even before they had uttered their first word. Together with mounting evidence, great apes are helping scientists build a clearer picture of our ancient ancestors as they moved towards fully fledged language.

By showing us that we are, after all, not so different from them, great apes help us learn where we come from, define who we are and, hopefully, decide where we are going as intelligent stewards of our precious planet.

 

Related Stories


Source: Research finds that orangutans can communicate about the past just like humans
35
Centre for Research on Globalisation / Averting World Conflict with C...
Last post by Centre for Research on Globalisation - December 15, 2018, 10:01:23 am
Averting World Conflict with China

As most readers know, I?m not a casual political blogger and I prefer producing lengthy research articles rather than chasing the headlines of current events. But there are exceptions to every rule, and the looming danger of a direct worldwide ...


The post Averting World Conflict with China appeared first on Global Research.


Source: Averting World Conflict with China
36
Centre for Research on Globalisation / The Case That Dare Not Speak I...
Last post by Centre for Research on Globalisation - December 15, 2018, 10:01:23 am
The Case That Dare Not Speak Its Name: The Conviction of Cardinal George Pell

?Freedom of the press in the world will cease to exist if a judge in one country is allowed to bar publication of information anywhere in the world.? ? Martin Baron, Executive Editor, The Washington Post, Dec 13, ...


The post The Case That Dare Not Speak Its Name: The Conviction of Cardinal George Pell appeared first on Global Research.


Source: The Case That Dare Not Speak Its Name: The Conviction of Cardinal George Pell
37
Centre for Research on Globalisation / ?Five Eyes? Intelligence Agenc...
Last post by Centre for Research on Globalisation - December 15, 2018, 10:01:23 am
?Five Eyes? Intelligence Agencies Behind Drive Against Chinese Telecom Giant Huawei.

Evidence has come to light that US operations against the Chinese telecommunications giant HuaWei (??) and the arrest and detention of one of its top executives, Meng Wanzhou, to face criminal charges of fraud brought by the US Justice ...


The post ?Five Eyes? Intelligence Agencies Behind Drive Against Chinese Telecom Giant Huawei. appeared first on Global Research.


Source: ?Five Eyes? Intelligence Agencies Behind Drive Against Chinese Telecom Giant Huawei.
38
Richard Mellor / Why is Marx Demonised? Here's...
Last post by Richard Mellor - December 14, 2018, 01:15:15 pm
Why is Marx Demonised?  Here's a Hint.

Excerpts from Karl Marx, The German Ideology written fall 1845 to mid-1846. From the Marxist Internet Archive

Was he wrong? Or was the guy on the right, right. Let Marx speak for himself.

"The first premise of all human history is, of course, the existence of living human individuals. Thus the first fact to be established is the physical organization of these individuals and their consequent relation to the rest of nature. Of course, we cannot here go either into the actual physical nature of man, or into the natural conditions in which man finds himself ? geological, hydrographical, climatic and so on. The writing of history must always set out from these natural bases and their modification in the course of history through the action of men.

Men can be distinguished from animals by consciousness, by religion or anything else you like. They themselves begin to distinguish themselves from animals as soon as they begin to produce their means of subsistence, a step which is conditioned by their physical organization. By producing their means of subsistence men are indirectly producing their actual material life.

The way in which men produce their means of subsistence depends first of all on the nature of the actual means of subsistence they find in existence and have to reproduce. This mode of production must not be considered simply as being the production of the physical existence of the individuals. Rather it is a definite form of activity of these individuals, a definite form of expressing their life, a definite mode of life on their part. As individuals express their life, so they are. What they are, therefore, coincides with their production, both with what they produce and with how they produce. The nature of individuals thus depends on the material conditions determining their production.
This production only makes its appearance with the increase of population. In its turn this presupposes the intercourse [Verkehr] of individuals with one another. The form of this intercourse is again determined by production.

The ideas of the ruling class are in every epoch the ruling ideas, i.e. the class which is the ruling material force of society, is at the same time its ruling intellectual force. The class which has the means of material production at its disposal, has control at the same time over the means of mental production, so that thereby, generally speaking, the ideas of those who lack the means of mental production are subject to it. The ruling ideas are nothing more than the ideal expression of the dominant material relationships, the dominant material relationships grasped as ideas; hence of the relationships which make the one class the ruling one, therefore, the ideas of its dominance. The individuals composing the ruling class possess among other things consciousness, and therefore think. Insofar, therefore, as they rule as a class and determine the extent and compass of an epoch, it is self-evident that they do this in its whole range, hence among other things rule also as thinkers, as producers of ideas, and regulate the production and distribution of the ideas of their age: thus their ideas are the ruling ideas of the epoch. For instance, in an age and in a country where royal power, aristocracy, and bourgeoisie are contending for mastery and where, therefore, mastery is shared, the doctrine of the separation of powers proves to be the dominant idea and is expressed as an ?eternal law.? "

Source: Why is Marx Demonised?  Here's a Hint.
39
AlterNet / Here's how men can put down th...
Last post by AlterNet - December 14, 2018, 01:15:03 pm
Here's how men can put down their 'male fragility' to talk effectively about gender and sexism


'Scene on Radio' hosts John Biewen & Celeste Headlee on how men can help fight patriarchy.


While I?ve spent the past season of Inflection Point focusing on what women can do to have more real-world power, "Scene on Radio" host  John Biewen and his co-host, award-winning journalist Celeste Headlee, have been examining how the patriarchy we?re rising up against was formed in the first place ? and what to do about it. But can we convince more men to see that it?s time for a change?

John Biewen isn?t new to exploring the many facets of systemic injustice or, for that matter, acknowledging his unearned societal privilege as a white male. Last season on "Scene on Radio," Biewen dove into the rabbit hole that is white supremacy for a series called Seeing White.

?I had in that case invited Chenjerai [Kumanyika] to come in and be my collaborator on that project,? Biewen told me in our conversation for "Inflection Point." ?We had conversations that were part of each episode to kind of unpack things. And I made it a very transparent part of the of that project that I am a white middle class dude trying to look at whiteness and race . . . and I am inherently suspect as the person doing that, and I need someone to kind of check my work.?

For his latest season, called MEN, John knew he needed a woman?s voice to help guide him and the audience through the experience of living at the short end of the gender power stick. Bringing in award-winning journalist Celeste Headlee as a collaborator was, in Biewen's words, a "no-brainer."

The vulnerable, sometimes painful conversations the co-hosts have about their experiences living within the patriarchy are what make MEN so much more than a dry, academic exploration of gender inequality. And Biewen and Headlee couldn?t have had these moments without a strong foundation of mutual trust and respect.

?It could have very well been that I was just liability insurance. With different kinds of podcasts, that could have been my role: to just say ?hey, we had a woman. She was a co-host,?? Headlee told me of her experience working with both Biewen and John Barth, PRX?s head of content. ?But it was made clear by both Johns that that's not what they wanted from me. They wanted a full voice and a full partner, and I took them at their word.?

Biewen says getting more men on board with gender equality is less about women shaming men into giving up power, than it is teaching men that there?s more than enough room at the top of the ladder for everyone.

?It's a little bit hard to express, but there's a sense of investment that men have in our position at the top of the gender hierarchy that we just have to be willing to let go of,? said Biewen. ?To just kind of soften that muscle and be willing to say: ?OK I'm going to listen. I'm going to listen, and I'm not going to be so quick to flex that muscle--to swing back and say, ?how dare you say something like that to me?--and not take it all so damn personally.?

Most of all, Biewen says, we need to show men that they may not be responsible for creating patriarchy, but they benefit from it at the cost of others. And for that reason, we?re all responsible for helping to make something better for future generations.

?We didn't invent this thing, you know. We all were born into, first of all, the bodies and the gender identities that nature and our brains gave us, but also the system,? Biewen said. ?And I think we have a responsibility to look around and to say, ?Is this is this actually fair and just and right? Do we need to change it?? But we don't need to flagellate ourselves with with guilt just because we happened to be born male identified.?

Hear more of my conversation with John Biewen and Celeste Headlee, co-hosts of "Scene on Radio ? MEN," on the latest episode of "Inflection Point."

 

 

Related Stories


Source: Here's how men can put down their 'male fragility' to talk effectively about gender and sexism
40
Centre for Research on Globalisation / Reconstrução do Iraque Há Um A...
Last post by Centre for Research on Globalisation - December 14, 2018, 01:15:00 pm
Reconstrução do Iraque Há Um Ano da Vitória sobre Estado Islamita, 16 Anos da Sangrenta Ocupação dos EUA



O Iraque, que nos anos de Saddam Hussein (1979-2003) viveu grande período de prosperidade e estabilidade social, então reconhecido pela ONU como um dos países árabes que mais respeitavam a diversidade religiosa, tem sido atualmente uma das nações mais devastadas



...


The post Reconstrução do Iraque Há Um Ano da Vitória sobre Estado Islamita, 16 Anos da Sangrenta Ocupação dos EUA appeared first on Global Research.


Source: Reconstrução do Iraque Há Um Ano da Vitória sobre Estado Islamita, 16 Anos da Sangrenta Ocupação dos EUA
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